Page 20 - 13 DMA-Niger Report 2012

Basic HTML Version

18
Investing In NIGER
2012
Water supply
and sanitation
Niger’s most impor tant water resource
is the Niger River, a supply that is already
in decline. Similarly, rainfall is limited
and drought is a common occurrence.
While domestic and industrial use
has grown over time, the demands
of the country’s agricultural sector
are predominant. However, significant
additional investment will be required
to upgrade irrigation systems if the
country’s full agricultural potential is to
be realised.
Great effor t has been made to move
the population from its dependence on
surface water to, at the most basic levels,
standpipes, boreholes and wells. Action
to reform urban water supplies began in
1999; this led, in 2001, to the granting of a
ten year concession to a private operator,
SEEN (Société d’Exploitation des Eaux
du Niger) to operate the water supply
network for over 50 of the country’s
major urban centres.
Investment in infrastructure has been
managed,with notable success, by the public
asset-holding institution SPEN (Société
de Patrimoine des Eaux du Niger), with
improvements in operational efficiency, bill
collection and financial performance.
However, rural areas still lag behind.While
42% of the population now has access to
drinking water, and the rural population
has increasingly moved away from the use
of surface water to boreholes and wells,
not all of these supplies are protected.
Repair and maintenance is underfunded
and the construction of toilets has not
kept pace with population growth.
Approved
development
projects
The African Development Bank (AfDB)
is committed to the promotion of the
country’s road infrastructure in order
to open up transportation links, and
development bank funding is in place to
fund a number of road schemes including
the Tibéri-Dakoro and Madaoua-Bouza
Road Improvement Project and Dori-Tera-
Burkina Faso Border Road Improvement
Project. In addition, the Bank intends to
finance technical and vocational training
to ensure the supply of skilled labour for
infrastructure management.
The
International
Development
Association (IDA) has approved a grant of
US$30mn to underwrite the cost of civil
works on unpaved road sections of the
more densely populated southwestern
and southern rural areas, facilitating
local access to markets and services,
and improving the management and
sustainability of road maintenance.
The World Bank’s Urban Water and
Sanitation Project for Niger was approved
in 2011 with a total funding commitment
of US$90.8mn.This five-year project aims to
increase access to sustainable water supply
service and improve sanitation services.
Conclusion
Substantial progress has already been
made in upgrading the country’s urban
areas, a project still very much in train. The
Niger government will require continued
investment from the private sector and from
international financial institutions to bring the
nation’s infrastructure – roads, power, water,
sanitation, ICT and telecommunications
services – up to the standard necessary to
maintain economic growth.
The Niger government will require continued
investment from the private sector and from
international financial institutions to bring
the nation’s infrastructure up to the standard
necessary to maintain economic growth